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The Other Way I Fill Time

It is time for pondering. I'm finishing my Summit prep work. I ponder of my Eve life is empty of exciting adventures or if I've lost the ability to see what is going on. The true problem is that I struggle with the feeling of being boring to other people. It is one of the side effects of writing and knowing that people read my meandering thoughts at times.

This same thing happened in September. Everything narrows down into information gathering and consumption and reproduction in a nice, neat package. Toss in the elections and I've spent more time writing then normal but it is not stuff for this blog. I've had verbal and written interview stuff to do. I've finished one and have another, largish one to come. I've gone through my mail, and comments, and discussions. I've had my monthly talk which, as always, is an absolute birthing ground for ideas, needs, problems, and concerns.

The side effect is that I will probably spend more time thinking than doing exciting, spaceship adventures. My industry and markets have become my fall back. They are actually rather time consumptive but in a more malleable way than fleet work. Wex and I are doing great. I've kind of picked up my stride to try to be a bit more organized. It stops Wex from suffering and keeps the ships flowing into the hands of corpmates. I find capital ship manufacturing to be very satisfying. One thing I do feel, as I discuss ships and plans with people, is that the time investment is easy to over look.

At the end of 2012 I decided that I wanted to build an Orca. I had longed for an Orca since my first weeks of playing the game. It was so big and flat and bluish colored. I was in love. Being just under a year old when I started the project, I decided that building an Orca would be amazing and turn me into an industrialist. But, I would also mine the bulk of the minerals that I could source in high sec because that made it extra special.

What building that Orca did, besides make me happy, was open the door to Capital Ship construction. I did not think of it directly at the time. And in truth, it would not be for quite a while later until my hard earned skills became useful. Capital ship manufacturing is awkward, bulky, and time consuming. On one character it takes me a few days to build everything that one ship needs. I then put that build on a second character because the hull itself needs another 10-14 days after all of the modules. Unlike many other hulls it is not a fast turn around.

I do enjoy it. It is one of my most imaginative times in Eve. I can see the conveyor belts of minerals rolling into the refiners. The huge sections of hull plating being lifted and welded onto the incomplete skeleton. Thew drone bays in their unending, bottle necked glory, being installed one after another down the length of the ship.

It took about two weeks for us to go from start up to production. Now we're spitting out a hull every few days. My work schedule makes it hard. Even as I write this I'm moving items back and forth and trying to get another build started. But, time whispers in my ear and laughs when I try to catch it.

However, I have acquired my first capital blueprint that belongs to me and not the ones that I use that belong to my co-corporation. I am super happy about this acquisition. It is very high on the chortle while licking my fingers and giggling scale of happy.

My research to perfection task is also going well. My frigate hulls are almost done and I am working on haulers and rigs. Once those are finished I'll look at broadening my cruiser collection and maybe even (squeal) pick up another capital blue print or two if I can start making ISK again.

My Eve life isn't super exciting and I doubt it will be anytime soon. The Summit. Then the minute writing. Then the elections. Then fanfest. Then... whatever happens... but I have plans and stuff to do to keep me entertained and occupied.

Eeeheeeheee blueprints.... (chortle)

Comments

  1. Weeeee!!!! Congrats on the new blueprint. I know my frigate blueprint set isn't worth very much, but it makes me happy. I can only imagine what a capital bpo would feel like.

    ReplyDelete
  2. Any tips on stelling capitals in low sec?
    They seem to sell slower since the jump changes.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. You will want to take the time to know your neighbors. If you are building in an area with no capital heavy corporations or capital fighting, your sales will be slow. That 5LY circle is very important. There is not as much buying from one end of the universe for the other due to fatigue. Spend time on zkillboard.

      Right now I'm selling to Snuff. It is now easier to buy in house. Pre Phoebe it was a different game and 50 mil could be saved across the universe. Now being able to build in house is a huge asset and I hope that more corps looking to have capital power will look to have an in house builder or ally.

      Delete

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