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TCS: The Price of Neglect

When I started running my market I spent a lot of time attempting to figure out how to predict the market. What I learned is that I cannot. The flavor of the month is the flavor of the week. To rely on one thing to heavily is to overstock and have items sit and delist after three months. Then, as soon as said item expires, buyers appear out of the woodwork for that item.

It is a cycle only made worse by the moments I neglect the market. This last week, I have neglected things. I made a choice with my free time to spend it working on the last minute Crius input and with my newbie war dec. Bosena, which has a huge inventory, would have to suffer through the random shortages.

With Crius deploying and my war dec over, I am trying to catch up to Bosena. That proves harder than expected. I have been invited to random fleets. I have been shipping items to Rens and moving them to Teon in an attempt to save money. Time seems to vanish faster and faster and I'm falling further and further behind with stocking.

This has happened before. Vacations, deployments, bouts of overtime at work, all of them affect the market. Every time I catch back up. Sometimes it can take a few days to sift through everything and get it all relisted if it has expired and listed if it has not. There is a small amount of missed orders in Eve Mentat. Not enough to be irritating but just enough to notice. I'll work on catching those holes as well.

With it being patch day it will be a good day to sit in the station and work on market orders. I also need to make a final decision on my office. I've been moving things to Rens and I've been saving money but everything has developed a delay and it seems messy. I am giving myself more work than I want to in my effort to try to save ISK.


Comments

  1. I like to sort my orders on time remaining with shortest times at the top every once in a while. It helps me find the ones that are about to expire so I can modify them which bumps them back up to a full 3 month listing and costs 100 ISK per order rather than having to pay broker fees on the full price again.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Yes. But, I am bad at remembering to do that across all of my alts and yeah... it is one of those areas I'm terrible about.

      Delete
  2. Did you enjoy being queen of the newbies? And given the same circumstance would you do it again? If yes to either then the market "problem" is not a problem. If things are not sold now, then in the general cyclic nature of Eve, they will sell "tomorrow". You had fun (from what I can tell) and that is the real goal of logging in.

    ReplyDelete
  3. " I have been shipping items to Rens and moving them to Teon in an attempt to save money."

    Shipping to Eystur would be cheaper, even after Push's "hub-to-hub" discount, *and* save a couple of jumps on the Teon transfer. Maybe be better, unless you're going to Rens anyway...

    ReplyDelete

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