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TCS: A Cultists Thoughts

Croda (Markets for ISK) has made a list of Business Blogs and he was kind enough to put me on it. I felt a bit embarrassed. The type where you rub your toe back and forth and go, "Gee, me?"

I've been working on the TCS year end post. It is not very exciting work. Mostly, I am taking screen shots of various regional market graphs. I am very pleased with them. But, with my first, conscious deployment of the CIMM and the results of 1.2 billion ISK, I was feeling a bit down.

I wasn't down that CIMM made money. I was down because 1.2 billion ISK is the type of ISK that many people sneer at and call space poor. It isn't that I am ashamed of the amount. It is 1.2 billion ISK I did not have at the start of January. It was that I worried about my Cults message.

The reason that I started calling my market practice the Cult of Reasonable Prices is because I was more interested in the social side of the experimenter than the ISK side. The ISK side was important but it was not at the top of the venture. When I started with TCS my goal was just not to lose money. That is often my goal in the ventures that I start.

But here I had been listed as a place to think or learn about making ISK and in a month I made 1.2 billion while he made oodles more. I'd like to make oodles but the path I've taken means that my oodles, are oodles of noodles. The poor, collage student's fare.
What is TCS? TCS is a social project. It is about improving the lives of those around me because improving their game life improves my own. It is also a part time project. That was what I was missing and one of the reasons my results are not as spectacular as those I consider 'real' traders.

Low Sec isn't where you go to find the best market hub. It is not where you go to dump all of your goods. Khori cannot get a high enough consumption in Molden heath for his T2 production turn around. Nor is Bosena fast enough to feed traders used tot he nectar of Jita et al.

What it is, is a place, where a motivated individual can create a steady and reasonable income part time. Someone such as myself who is a resident of low sec but not defined in any one particular way.

Of course, as a Cultist, I want to preach my message. The CIMM showed that maintaining a market is reasonable enough to bring in ISK. At 1.2 billion ISK I can replace the ship losses I received while we were deployed with left overs. I can give myself a viable income while providing a service which improves my general life. I need to make pamphlets for this religion of mine. The store could support a player's PvP. That entire concept must be a success. But, pamphlets may help me spread the word.

For now, I have finished my buy orders and written a stack of contracts to get it moved. In the morning, restocking. But that will be the morning.

Comments

  1. "Gee me?" You aren't really recognizing your effect on the lives of the citizens of Molden Heath. You single-handedly made it possible for them to shop locally.

    You also made this documented step-by-step for anyone to follow. And you made money, disproving that helping others needs you to be an altruist saint.

    You earned the followers on this blog and the votes you'll get are earned too. Such things can't be gained by luck.

    ReplyDelete
  2. I agree with Gevlon - and correct me if I'm wrong, but it appears that you've made this 1.2 Bil almost entirely in losec and that's absolutely a great achievement!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks. Its from my mobile market in our deployment system. All low sec sales.

      Delete
  3. This is what happens when I spend too much time overseas on business . . . . I miss posts on the blogs I follow!

    Gevon nailed it - I can't find any other blog that talks about seeding a market in null sec; discusses the issues around it; daily operations required; pricing dynamics; time required; and profits derived. Plenty of points that someone looking to make ISK generally or in nullsec can learn from.

    Infect, few blogs talk about making ISK in nullsec at all.

    ReplyDelete

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