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Origin of a Spaceship: Omen

Excerpt from: Origin of a Spaceship

Omen
Background

Perhaps the most exhaustively explored and inventoried area of space, the Golden Nebula, known simply as Amarr is home to the Omen. One of the most common and easily tamed cruisers, Omen's were domesticated early in the Nebula's settlement. This led to exhaustive breeding programs and fossil records as well as early diagrams and sketches show that the current Omen does not quite look like its ancestors.  Enough similarities exist to solidly document the spaceships move from the wild to domestication.

Like many ships native to the Amarr Nebula the Omen is a deep, rich gold that it uses for camouflage. The natural, heavy armor protects it from the particle heavy aspect of this particular, vivid part of the cluster. A fast paced predator, the Omen is not always a heavy hitter but tends to be conscious and steady with the natural tendency of Amarr ships to suffer pure exhaustion and energy loss. This is believed to be why they were so easy to domesticate due to easy capture after exhaustive attempts to hunt the surveyors many specimens were fed rods of condensed energy and became tame, following the surveyors around and associating mankind with nourishment and companionship.

Observations

Omen are one of several spaceship species that are no longer found in the wild. Easy breeders and prolific, they have been developed into individual strains, identified as doctrines that do not crossbreed well. This leads to a tendency for each corporation to focus their Omen training and have trained, narrowly focused spaceships.

Highly social, Omen do best in fleets. Singular specimens can be found but often they are lame or deranged. Singular Omen are well known to bond with other spaceship types, leading to the general understanding that the fleet is gregarious in nature and habit. If not properly trained an Omen will pick up the habits of those around it, using unsuitable weaponry and attempting to support a shield focus.

Other Points of Note

While easy tempered and manageable by even the youngest pilot, the Omen is a fierce predator prone to striking with its berrylike projection on its brow. This often leads the Omen into heavy combat a situation that not all sub-species (also known as doctrines by breeders) are suited for. However, the steadfast temperament and hard hitting power of the Omen often causes the spaceship to push past its expected potential.

They are a prolific if underrated breed Omen's consume a large amount of energy making them unsuited for nomadic groups without energy capture substructure. They are attracted to golden suns when in deep space. Researchers believe that back in the Omen's origin they soaked up solar rays to recharge themselves leading to many territorial battles on the sun.

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