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It Looks Kinda Sad

Sometimes trolling doesn't work.

I've often commented about not understanding smack talk and the methods behind it. I've been told that people get angry and do stupid things. Some enjoy getting people worked up and ranting and frothing at the mouth. It will be my eternal question forever asked and never answered.

I was chatting with Diz before bed when he went, "LOL. The bombers bar sent me a tear collection mail because I engaged them on a gate and died. Maybe I should send them one back for the ships I killed before they killed my interceptor and pod."

http://eve-kill.net/?a=kill_related&kll_id=20821170

I read said survey mail. I guess it is amusing.

I've avoided public groups. I know not everyone does this type of thing. It still makes me rub my head in confusion. Maybe a gank, sure. Or maybe a WTFBBQ. But on an everyone run to see if the Titan dies kinda day?

Everyone is there to fight. Everyone is running head first into the mass of people to try to get battle. Everyone is there to kill and everyone is there to die. Third parties. Fourth. Fifth. Eight. The entire point is a head first dive into a pit of raw frenzy. I need to try it one day. At least once to say that I did.

And what is losing a ship in Eve? These days it is just part of the game. I know that people get upset. Greatly upset. There is a lot invested in the ship. Pride. Time. Energy. Dreams and hopes. I know that for some the loss of the ship is the loss of the game. But that isn't everyone. There are few things I love hearing more then, "That's the price of getting work done," when someone loses a ship because they went out and got into the fight.

But everyone isn't my social circle. I'm seeped in it and I know. I probably ask too much. I'll blame it on my head cold. It is making me irrational. Back to bed.

Comments

  1. Expecting tears for an interceptor loss?!

    These lolPvP people are more pathetic than I expected. I mean if they'd kill a carrier, they might get tears. But no one cries for a frig hull.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. The act of looking for 'tears' is irrational in itself. I don't think the scale of loss in (pixel) reality matters much for those who go hunting for them.

      Never understood the desire myself. Not much fun going to bed at night thinking 'I made someone cry today.' I think it's far more rewarding to have the nice post-fight chat, commenting on what went well, badly or hilariously wrong. And you don't even need to win the fight to have that.

      Delete
    2. Gevlon wouldn't cry over a frig loss. Go figure. But people quit Eve over frig losses. We might thing that that is foolish, but it does not change that it is true.

      Every person playing Eve has the potential of having entirely different game objectives from the players they com into contact with. They will play the game "wrong" from our perspective. We don't have to get it.

      As far as the tears complaint form, some people play this game relishing in the belief that the other guy is sitting at his computer, raging or crying because they lost their ship. They send those mails out to everyone, hoping to get a response, so they get a "Kill email" record.

      It stimulates them, much like Gevlon is stimulated by the comments on his blog where people tell him he is wrong, giving him an opportunity to refute them. It's not all about flying spaceships to him, so why would we believe that the Tear Collection Mail is anything else but an opportunity to get some more entertainment for their $14.99 a month?

      It would be nice, I guess, to share an Eve Experience with your adversaries. Where we could fight today and chat peacefully afterwards. Unfortunately, most people I fight are kind of jerks. Or at least, their online persona's are jerks.

      They are probably nice people in real life. Computer security people and engineers with 2.2 kids and a dog.

      Delete
    3. I find you using the word "lolpvper" quite amusing, since you are too afraid to even try pvp. Crying over a frig is indeed a bit irracional, but you are so afraid of loosing one, that you don't even try and go to great lengths to racionalize your view. And you fail at that misereably, which is constantly pointed out. Therefore you have no right to call someone a "lolpvper". He is much above you in this game.

      Delete
    4. There might be "Lolpvpers" although one might argue that's the whole point behind pvp, but you are certainly a lolfarmer.

      Delete

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