Skip to main content

jEveAssets - Eve-Online Asset Manager

I decided to try jEveAssets. It is an Eve Online asset manager that has been getting a lot of good word of mouth among those that I play with.

Over the course of my playing, assets have started to sprawl out of control. Most of these are tucked away in low sec stations. Ether they are loot drop offs or ships dropped off mid roam and never recovered. The loot is nothing special, just regular T1 and T2 things. Expensive loot goes to the link alt or dedicated cloaky hauler who will gather and sell it after the fleet. The little stuff just gets gathered and dumped into hangars.

I'm a container user in Eve. This is the average look of my hangars. Now, I have learned to use the filter to sort through items. I use it extensively for TCS. But for my everyday needs? Station containers all day, erryday.


The side effect of being a container user is that I cannot use the asset list productively. The in game asset list does not search containers for you. You can remotely search them and because I have all of mine neatly labeled (random contains things like skill books and blueprints) I can find what I need. My industry alts have containers labeled ore (if they mine) and minerals (if they build). My booster maker has booster/gas/pos related containers. Etc. My life is organized.

But I cannot use the in game asset search.

One of the things I discovered when I started to use Aura for Android was that it had a comprehensive list of my items. My mind, slow to catch on because I am not a coder of any level, realized that of course the items are just information dumps and Eve chooses to sort them as it chooses. Third parties can take this raw information and use it or open it up, such as Aura did.

That made jEveAssets an interesting option that I wanted to try. I could get a comprehensive list of what I owned. If I was fortunate it would also let me have a comprehensive list of what the Cougar Store owns. A lot of the applications that I use do not have high level corporation details and the developers have focused their time on individual accounts vs the corporate accounts. I'd also like to point out that I am not complaining. I cannot create these projects and I appreciate what they do create. I will not judge a product as bad or poor because it does not have features I want. If I want them I can get off my butt and learn to make them instead of complaining and negatively reviewing others for having different wants, needs, and desires.

Assets are an interesting part of player wealth. Wealth is often calculated as liquid ISK. Liquid ISK is the ISK that can be spent at this moment sitting in the player wallet. Then there are assets that we create to make ISK such as manufacturing and production lines or mining ore to reprocess or sell directly. Those are the same types of asset that we would see in most games where we collect our pelts from the wolves we kill and sell them at the local market.

But the other things in Eve our gear so to speak, hulls, modules and rigs, are also assets. Not only do PvP killboards keep a running tally of the amount of ISK each item is worth on the market but the items themselves have worth on the market. There is no soul binding. My stuff can be your stuff. I can eject from a ship in space or simply hand over everything that I own until there is nothing left but the implants plugged into my clones. It makes calculating assets an actual measurement of wealth.

Once I loaded everything up I built new API keys in for the program. I built one for each account and one for each of my two corporations. They do not have to be full API keys. Once built, I plugged it all in and asked it to look at everything.

The total, once I deleted some items from the count that belong to my Capital Ship building company, is about 70 billion in assets + ISK across the accounts. I am not sure if I am surprised or disappointed. I am still far from my goal of 100 billion ISK. The completel, easily searchable list is nice. It also seems to be drawing from my corporate assets which gives me a nice, broad snapshot.

I like this program and think I will spend some time playing with it. It does remind me that I am going to have to spend some time consolidating assets and rescuing spaceships from unused places about the game. That, however, is another adventure.

Comments

  1. At one point, between my mix of living out of a wormhole, low-sec exploration, and chasing incursions, I had ships and other assets spread out over 160+ systems. It think that's down to a more reasonable 30-40, with the bulk consolidated in trade hubs.

    Courier contracts are quite an effective way to get stuff moved. Even through a patch of low-sec, I was surprised how quickly a 2-mil reward contract would be picked up. Set up contracts from your assets window, wait a few days, and you've saved yourself a lot of hauling.

    ReplyDelete
  2. jEveAssets is a huge time saver for me. I can see at a glance where my money is and what needs doing on which characters.

    I agree with Araziah about courier contracts too. I was very surprised how quickly public contracts in the middle of nowhere get picked up and delivered. Even when they have high collateral or are deep in low sec. In fact they're usually delivered more quickly than RFF contracts between main hubs.

    ReplyDelete

Post a Comment

Popular posts from this blog

Memoirs - Part One: Virtual Worlds

Virtual Realities: Memoirs of an internet spaceship politician by Sugar Kyle CSM9, CSMX
This is where it really started. The day I lost my mind.

I never told anyone how long I had been debating my run for the ninth CSM. The thought started to circle in the back of my thoughts in November. I was back home after a sucessful Eve Vegas. I had met a few people. My notes from the presentations and round tables had gone over very well. I felt useful, comfortable, and excited that I was a member of the community. I belonged and I cared about this thing that I belonged to. That thing was the community of Eve Online.
Eve Vegas of 2013 was when I found out that a conversation I had been fortunate enough to have with CCP Masterplan at Fanfest of that same year, had sparked enough interest to gain developer attention. At Eve Vegas I learned that they would be working on ideas based off of the premise that I had presented. Only days later, a developer posted to the Offical Eve Online forums about i…

Sugar’s Non-Technical Guide to Making Boosters

Welcome to my non-technical and outdated but probably still useful guide to boosters.  There have been changes to how things are built in Eve. This was the old POS code before the introduction of new structures in 2016.   This is just a walk through on my wobbling path of booster production.  It took me half a dozen different documents to figure out what I needed to do to make these mythical things.  It is what I do.  It may not be perfect but it works.

This is pirate focused industry.
This guide brought to you by Lain asking me to write it after I tried to explain it in chat.

Why make boosters? Because drugs are good.  Really they are performance enhancers and performance enhancers can give someone that extra edge in PvP.  It was also because my boys used them and when they ran low they often ran out, I could be their supplier.  They would no longer hoard their drugs due to the length of time it takes to get fresh product.. The thought of being a drug kingpin was also very appealing. …

Will the real player please stand up?

I installed Eve on my Surface the other day. I then remembered why my last laptop, when I was playing Eve, was an Alienware gaming laptop. My Surface, wonderful creature that it is, runs Eve at such a tiny magnification that I squint to see it. I could change my settings and adjust for this. Instead, I'll stick to my desktop and try to remember to log in and see the latest round of changes.

Yet, here I am writing.

Deep in the muzzy field of my brain that has been working almost daily for the last six weeks, random thoughts bubble up. I may not log in and spend my time focusing on Eve as a world, but it hasn't slipped from me. I've picked up an amazing group of friends that I talk to daily and many of them still play enough that I skim the social edges. At times I'm angry that the same social problems exist. At others, I'm fascinating by the process.

Today is a fascinating day because I've been answering e-mails. I still get e-mails occasionally from people who …